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ARTHIST 2T03 Art, Thtr &Music /Enlightenmnt

Academic Year: Winter 2018

Term: Winter

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Devin Therien

Email: theriend@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 416

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23668

Office Hours: TBD



Course Objectives:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:This course examines the linkages between art, theatre, and music in Early Modern Europe, paying particular attention to how artists’, poets’, and composers’ interactions led to the production of the first multi-media works. In addition to examining the work of such transformative artistic figures as the poet Torquato Tasso, the sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini, and the composers Antonio Vivaldi and Georg Friedrich Handel, the course studies the noble and royal court as a space of cross-cultural exchange, where painters depicted the playing of music, poets described paintings and worked with artists on theatrical designs, and musicians composed concerts and operas performed in spaces designed by artists. In short, this class studies how the visual, poetic, and performative arts merged to produce a lively and entertaining culture most visible at such cultural capitals as the Papal Court in Rome, the French Court at Versailles, and the Georgian Court of Britain.

 

Course Objectives:

By the end of this course students should be able to,

• define, describe, and analyse key works by major artists, poets and musicians, in the history of Early-Modern Europe

• demonstrate critical reading skills, particularly in the area of critically-evaluating historical and modern interpretations and examinations of Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo artistic culture.

• apply historical research and writing skills introduced in class.

• demonstrate verbal and written communication skills through regular discussions and papers.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Course Reading Package: Art, Theatre, and Music in the Enlightenment – ART HIST 2T03

 

Art and Cultural History Reference Texts:

J. Adamson, The Princely Courts of Europe: Ritual, Politics and Culture Under the Ancient Régime 1500-1750, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1999, A. Blunt, Art and Architecture in France, 1500 to 1700, Penguin: 1980; J. C. Brown et al, Medici Women: The Making of Dynasty in Grand Ducal Tuscany, University of Toronto Press, (CRRS): 2015; F. Hartt, History of Italian Renaissance Art: Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, Pearson Prentice Hall: 2006 (or newer); V. Hyde Minor, Baroque and Rococo: Art and Culture, Lawrence King (London): 1999; W. Kalnein & M. Levey, Art and Architecture of the Eighteenth Century in France, Penguin: 1972; T. D. Kaufmann, Court, Cloister, and City: The Art of Central Europe, 1540-1800, University of Chicago Press: 1995; J. Pope Henessey, An Introduction to Italian Sculpture, London & New York: 1970, 2nd. Ed. Rev., 3 Vols.; J. Pomeroy & C. Strinati (ed.), Italian Women Artists from Renaissance to Baroque, Skira: 2007; E. Waterhouse, Painting in Britain, 1530-1790, Penguin: 1978; R. Wittkower, Art and Architecture in Italy: 1600-1750, Penguin: 1999.

 

Online Resources:

 

Kubikat – German Art Libraries Network: http://aleph.mpg.de/F?func=file&file_name=find-b&local_base=kub01

AMICUS, Library and Archives Canada: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/lib

Naxos Classical Music Library:

https://libraryssl.lib.mcmaster.ca/libaccess/login.php?url=http%3a%2f%2fmcmaster.naxosmusiclibrary.com%2f

 

 


Method of Assessment:

Course Evaluation: Participation, 10%; 3 Short Answer Tests, 10% each (30%); Mid-Term, 10%; Term paper, 20%; Final Exam, 30 %

 

Students in this course will receive a grade of at least 10% by March 16, 2017

 

Participation 10%: Attending every class and participating in class discussion is necessary to achieve 10%. Attendance will be taken every class.

Students are expected to attend every class and be prepared to discuss the assigned weekly readings and other subjects that are raised during lecture. Students must participate regularly and be prepared to openly answer questions about course and textbook material to achieve a good grade.

 

3 Short Answer tests, 10% each (30%): Each test will be a one-page written answer to a specific question relating to the subject of the assigned weekly reading and film. Students will receive the question in class one week before it is due. Students will have two class days to view each film (at home or at Mills Library) and prepare a one-page (1.5-spaced, 1 inch margins) response to the given question.

  1. Rembrandt (1934) – available open source (copyright expired)
  2. Casanova (1987) – On reserve at Mills Library
  3. The Duchess (2008) – On reserve at Mills Library or rentable (YouTube; iTunes; Amazon Video, etc.)

 

Mid-Term 10%: A concisely written and clearly-articulated introduction to the term essay must be submitted in class on February 16 at 8:30am (See instructions below for details).

 

Term Essay 20%: A fully-researched and edited 1,500-word essay examining one of the works of art and the related theme listed below. (See below for full instructions on all written assignments).

 

1) Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s Ecstasy of St. Teresa (1647-52, Cornaro Chapel, Rome) and theatre in Baroque Rome (performance, etc.).

 

2) Johannes Vermeer’s Lady Seated at a Virginal, National Gallery, London, (1670-73) and Baroque music (depicted, performed, designed, etc.) in Netherlandish visual culture.

 

3) Jean-Antoine Watteau, The Embarquement for Cythera (1717) and the spectacle of love in 18th-century-country scenes.

 

4) Thomas Gainsborough, Lady Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire, Chatsworth House, (1785) and the performance of beauty and happiness.

 

Alternatively, students may select their own subject—presented in a brief written and oral statement—which will then be considered for approval by the Professor.

 

Final Examination 30% (TBD)

 

***Important Note*** Written Work (Mid-Term, Short Test, and Term Papers Only):

All written work will be marked on grammar, clarity of writing, and organization, as well as content, analysis, and depth of research. All essays must include a thesis statement, outline of arguments, successive arguments that support the thesis, and a conclusion that restates the thesis and makes several concluding points about the subject discussed. All essays must be properly referenced, with footnotes and a bibliography corresponding to the Chicago Manual on Style formatting for books and journals. All essays must have a cover page and illustrations of all the images discussed. Lastly, they must be printed in Calibri Body font, double-spaced, single-sided pages, and have 1.5 inch margins. 2% will be deducted for every spelling, grammatical, and formatting error.

All research must be conducted using peer-reviewed publications, including academic journals, books, and exhibition catalogues. Students must use the authoritative catalogue raisonné (complete catalogue of works) when writing about their chosen artist (i.e. Catherine Puglisi, Caravaggio).

5% will be deducted for every citation linked to non peer-reviewed research materials (i.e. Blogs, Wikipedia, Studyblue, Khan Academy, the Heilbrunn Timeline or any online content that is not peer reviewed. This rule also applies to artist essays or descriptions of art works found in General Dictionaries (i.e. Encyclopedia Britannica) or Gallery or Institution webpages). The only exception is the Grove Dictionary of Art.

 

 


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

LATE AND / OR MISSED WORK: It is the responsibility of each student to attend class, tests and exams and meet the requirements of the course. Missed exams and late papers will automatically be assigned a grade of 0. Exceptions to this policy will only be made in the specific instances outlined below (see McMaster Student Absence Form), and only when met by approval from the Faculty/Program office and course instructor.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

This is a self-reporting tool for undergraduate students to report absences DUE TO MINOR MEDICAL SITUATIONS that last up to 5 days and provides the ability to request accommodation for any missed academic work. Please note, this tool cannot be used during any final examination period. You may submit a maximum of 1 Academic Work Missed request per term. It is YOUR responsibility to follow up with your Instructor immediately (NORMALLY WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS) regarding the nature of the accommodation. If you are absent for reasons other than medical reasons, for more than 5 days, or exceed 1 request per term, you MUST visit your Associate Dean's Office/Faculty Office). You may be required to provide supporting documentation. This form should be filled out immediately when you are about to return to class after your absence.

 

Please note the following policies and statements:

 

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: 'Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty'), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

 

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one's own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

 

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student's own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student. Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

 

Modification of course outlines

McMaster University reserves the right to change or revise information contained in course outlines in extreme circumstances. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of students to check regularly their primary email account via their @mcmaster.ca alias and course websites.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

LECTURE SCHEDULE & READINGS:

 

Jan. 4 & 5 – Discovering the Artistic Culture of Early Modern Europe

Readings: – V. H. Minor, Baroque and Rococo: Idea and Image

 

Jan. 9, 11 & 12 – The Humanistic Theory of the Arts

Readings: – R. W. Lee, Ut Pictura Poesis: The Humanistic Theory of Painting

 

Jan. 16, 18 & 19 –

Readings: D. Rosand, Theatre and Structure in the Art of Paolo Veronese

Short Test Due in class Jan. 19, 2017

 

Jan. 23, 25 & 26 – Painting Music, Musicians, and Musical Performances

Readings: F. T. Camiz, The Castrato Singer: From Informal to Formal Portraiture

 

Jan. 30, Feb. 1 & 2 – The Court as Center of Display and Social Status

Readings: L. Rosow, Power and Display: Music at Court Theatre

 

Feb. 6, 8 & 9 – Painting Poetry and Mythology 

Readings: R. W. Lee, Armida’s Abandonment: A Study in Tasso Iconography Before 1700

 

Feb. 13, 15 & 16 – The Visual Arts as a Spectacle for the Eyes 

Readings: L. Visconti, Bernini in the Theatre

 

Feb. 20, 22, & 23 – Mid-Term Recess

 

Feb. 27, Mar. 1, & 2 – The Court as Center for Social Rank and Artistic Dominance

Readings: M. Levey, The Courtier-Artist

Short Test # 2 Due Mar. 2 in Class

 

Mar. 6, 8, & 9 – Heaven and Earth United: Late Baroque and Rococo Sacred Architecture  

Readings: K, Harries, Theatrum Sacrum

 

Mar. 13, 15 & 16 – Absolutism and Allegories and Reagle Superiority

Readings: K. Christiansen, Tiepolo, Theatre, and the Notion of Theatricality

 

Mar. 20, 22 & 23 – The Portrait and Performing Rank

Readings: E. P. Bowron & P. B. Kerber, Pompeo Batoni: Prince of Painters in 18th-Century Rome

Short Test # 3 Due Mar. 23 in Class

 

Mar. 27 & 29 – Painting Social Engagements in Rococo France

Readings: G. J. Cowart, The Musical Theatre in Watteau’s Paris

 

Apr. 3, 5 & 6 (Last Day of Class) –

 

Term Essay Due Apr. 5 at 8:30am in class

 

Readings: No Readings


Other Course Information:

AVENUE TO LEARN:

In this course we will be using Avenue to Learn. Students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course. The available information is dependent on the technology used. Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure. If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure, please discuss this with the course instructor.

SUPPORT SERVICES:

The University provides a variety of support services to help students manage their many demands. Reference librarians can provide invaluable research assistance. The Student Accessibility Services Centre (SAS) provides assistance with personal as well as academic matters. http://sas.mcmaster.ca/