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ARTHIST 1A03 World Art&Cultural Heritage I

Academic Year: Fall 2015

Term: Fall

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Sabine Noack-Haley

Email: noacks@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 434

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23719

Office Hours: Mo. & Wed. 9:30--10:30 am



Course Objectives:

This course provides an overview of the development of art and architecture from first manifestations in Prehistory and by itinerant First Peoples to the monumental buildings created by settled agrarian societies up to the Late Middle Ages in Europe, the Near East, South- and Southeast Asia, East Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The course aims at conveying to students a fundamental understanding of the concept of ‘visual art’ and at enabling them to analyze objects of art in different media, including architecture. Students will learn to appreciate art not only as expressing aesthetic ideals, but also iconographic content and socio-cultural realities.

Lectures and tutorials examine a selection of the most characteristic examples of art and architecture produced / created in a broad geographical and chronological spectrum, and address the designation and preservation of World Cultural Heritage sites. Students will learn to identify features used for the stylistic classification of art objects, and to recognize cross-currents and communalities between the different spheres.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Stokstad, Marilyn and Michael W. Cothren, Art History, Volume 1 (Pearson 2014, 5th edition).

Additional reading and instructions for the writing assignment may be posted successively as the course progresses on the course website on ‘Avenue to Learn’.


Method of Assessment:

  1. Attendance at lectures & tutorials: 12%
  2. Writing assignment: 22%
  3. Midterm exam: 28%
  4. Final exam: 38% 

 The writing assignment, midterm and final exam will receive a letter grade based on the grading scale shown below. Grading criteria for written summaries will include factual accuracy, clarity of organization, appropriate use of examples, and style of presentation (including grammar, punctuation and spelling). 

Grading Scale:

A+ 90-100      B+  77-79        C+  67-69        D+       57-59

A   85-89         B    73-76        C    63-66        D         53-56

A-  80-84        B-   70-72        C-   60-62        D-       50-52

                                                                         F           0-49


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Late submissions of the writing assignment will be penalized 3% per calendar day late, including weekends. Late penalties will not be waived unless your Faculty/Program Office advises the instructor that you have submitted to that office the appropriate documentation to support your inability to submit the work by the due date.

Final exam: No make-up exams will be given unless the absence was necessitated by a documented emergency; emergencies and/or absences must be processed through the student’s faculty office. 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Week 1: Sept. 9: Introduction

Week 2:  Sept. 14: Prehistoric Art

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 1

                 Sept. 16: Art of the Ancient Near East

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 2

Week 3: Sept. 21: Art of Ancient Egypt

                Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 3

                Sept. 23: Art of the Ancient Aegean

                Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 4

Week 4: Sept. 28: Art of Ancient Greece

                Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 5

                Sept. 30: Art of Ancient Greece

                Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 5

Week 5: Oct. 5: Etruscan and Early Roman Art

                Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 6

                 Oct. 7: Roman Art

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 6

Week 6: Reading week – no classes

Week 7: Oct. 19: Jewish and Early Christian Art

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 7

                 Oct. 21: Byzantine Art

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 8

Week 8: Oct. 26: Islamic Art

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 9

                 Oct. 28: Midterm exam

Week 9: Nov. 2: Art of South and Southeast Asia before 1200               

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 10

                 Nov. 4: Chinese and Korean Art before 1279

                 Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 11

Week 10: Nov. 9: Japanese Art before 1333 

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 12

                  Nov. 11: Early Medieval Art in Europe

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 15

Week 11: Nov. 16: Romanesque Art

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 16

                  Nov. 18: Art of the Americas before 1300

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 13

Week 12: Nov. 23: Art of the Americas before 1300

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 13

                  Nov. 25: Early African Art

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 14

Week 13: Nov. 30: Gothic Art of the 12th and 13th Centuries

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 17

                  Dec. 2:  Art of the 14th Century in Europe

                  Reading: Stokstad – Cothren, Chap. 18

Week 14: Dec. 7: Summary

Final exam


Other Course Information:

-- Writing assignment is to be typed in font size 12, double spaced. A header needs to provide the student’s first and last name and student number. The assignment shall have a title, and its length shall not exceed 9 pages.  Nature of the writing assignment: The student is to 1) select a work of art/architecture among those presented in class or in the textbook, provide its basic data (subject, provenance, material, period [exact/approximate date if known], artist [if known], place where it is today [including country], heritage designation [if applicable]), and give a detailed description using appropriate terminology, 2) select a second work of art/architecture of the same time period, but a different part of the world, provide its basic data (as above), and give a detailed description using appropriate terminology, and 3) compare these two works of art/architecture. The comparison is to analyze features that they may share and features that distinguish them from each other, and to discuss reasons why they share similarities or why they are dissimilar, applying methods of art history taught in the course. Due date of the writing assignment: A paper copy of the writing assignment is to be submitted to the instructor no later than on November 30, 2015, at 10:30 am.

-- It is the policy of the School of the Arts that all e-mail communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from the student's own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student. Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account. All emails should be signed by the sender.

-- Attendance at lectures is mandatory. Cellular phones and other communication devices should be turned off at the beginning of lectures. Students are expected to remain for the duration of the class meeting time. At certain points in the course it may make good sense to modify the schedule outlined above. The instructor reserves the right to modify elements of the course and will notify students accordingly (in class and posting any changes to the course website on ‘Avenue to Learn’).

-- Academic Integrity Policy: You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process.  Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity. Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage.  This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads:  "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty.
For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/univsec/policy/AcademicIntegrity.pdf

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one's own or for which other credit has been obtained.
2.  Improper collaboration in group work.
3.  Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

PLEASE NOTE:

The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term.  The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances.  If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes.  It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster e-mail and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

When necessary, additional information and references will be posted on Avenue to Learn.