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ART HIST 2I03 RENAISSANCE ART

Academic Year: Fall/Winter 2013/2014

Term: 1

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Gregory Davies

Email:

Office:

Phone: 905-525-9140 x

Office Hours: Monday, 11:30 am -12:30 pm., or by appointment



Course Objectives:

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus upon the art and architecture of Italy and northern Europe from the late 13th through 16th centuries.  As we progress through this survey we will attempt to refine our understanding of what constitutes the ‘Renaissance’. What does this term mean? What are its origins and how has the word conditioned our understanding of the visual forms associated with it? In the course of this enquiry we will also consider the social and cultural forces that helped shape the art and architecture of the period. This will entail discussion of the religious, political, economic and intellectual contexts in which artists and the visual arts flourished.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

COURSE TEXT:

Frederick Hartt & David Wilkins, History of Italian Renaissance Art, 7th ed., (Pearson, 2011)

Craig Harbison, Mirror of the Artist, The: Art of Northern Renaissance, Perspectives Series

(Pearson, 1996)


Method of Assessment:

COURSE EVALUATION:  The final grade for this course will derive from three pieces of work. There will be one short test, one essay and a final examination. The marking scheme for each is listed below:

Short Test: 25%           (OCT. 16)       Essay 35% (DUE NOV. 7)*                Final exam: 40% (TBA)

The requirements for each will be discussed in class.

*Instructions and guidelines for the essay will be provided during the week of Sept. 16.


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

This is a self-reporting tool for undergraduate students to report absences DUE TO MINOR MEDICAL SITUATIONS that last up to 5 days and provides the ability to request accommodation for any missed academic work. Please note, this tool cannot be used during any final examination period. You may submit a maximum of 1 Academic Work Missed request per term. It is YOUR responsibility to follow up with your Instructor immediately (NORMALLY WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS) regarding the nature of the accommodation. If you are absent for reasons other than medical reasons, for more than 5 days, or exceed 1 request per term, you MUST visit your Associate Dean's Office/Faculty Office). You may be required to provide supporting documentation. This form should be filled out immediately when you are about to return to class after your absence.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

LECTURE SCHEDULE & READINGS:

Sept. 6, 9                                Introduction

EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY: TRECENTO ART

(All Readings from Hartt & Wilkins)

 

Sept. 11,13

 

Chapter 3 FLORENTINE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 72

Giotto 73

Florentine Painters after Giotto 95

Sculpture 100

 

Sept. 16, 18

 

Chapter 4 SIENESE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 102

Duccio 103

Simone Martini 110

Pietro Lorenzetti 119

Ambrogio Lorenzetti 122

 

Sept. 20, 23

 

Chapter 5 LATER GOTHIC ART IN TUSCANY AND NORTHERN ITALY 136

Mid-Trecento Art in Florence 138

Late Gothic Painting and the International Style 145

Painting and Sculpture in Northern Italy 149

 

THE QUATTROCENTO IN FLORENCE

(All Readings from Hartt & Wilkins)

 

Sept. 25,27

 

Chapter 6 THE RENAISSANCE BEGINS: ARCHITECTURE 158

The Role of the Medici Family 160

Filippo Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective 161

The Dome of Florence Cathedral 164

 

The Ospedale degli Innocenti 168

Brunelleschi’s Sacristy for San Lorenzo 170

San Lorenzo and Santo Spirito 170

The Pazzi Chapel 174

The Medici Palace and Michelozzi di Bartolommeo 174

 

Sept. 30, Oct. 2

 

Chapter 7 TRANSITIONS IN TUSCAN SCULPTURE 180

The Competition Panels 181

Ghiberti to 1425 183

Donatello to 1420 188

Nanni di Banco 193

Donatello (c. 1420 to c. 1435) 196

 

Chapter 8 TRANSITIONS IN FLORENTINE PAINTING 202

Gentile da Fabriano 203

Masolino and Masaccio 206

 

Chapter 9 THE HERITAGE OF MASACCIO: FRA ANGELICO AND FRA FILIPPO LIPPI 222

Fra Angelico 224

Fra Filippo Lippi 232

 

Oct. 4, 7

 

Chapter 10 FLORENTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, c. 1430—1455 238

Alberti 239

Ghiberti after 1425 249

Luca della Robbia 251

Donatello (c. 1433 to c. 1455) 254

 

Chapter 11 FLORENTINE PAINTING AT MID-CENTURY 262

Paolo Uccello 263

Domenico Veneziano 267

Andrea del Castagno 271

Piero della Francesca 278

 

Oct. 9, 11

 

Chapter 12 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI I 294

Donatello after 1453 298

 

Chapter 13 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI II 318

Antonio del Pollaiuolo 320

Andrea del Verrocchio 327

Renaissance Cassoni 331

Alessandro Botticelli 332

Filippino Lippi 347

Domenico del Ghirlandaio 350

 

Oct. 14                    NO CLASS: THANKSGIVING

 

Oct. 16                    TEST (IN CLASS: 30 MINS.)

 

EARLY ART IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY

(All Readings from Hartt & Wilkins)

 

Oct. 18, 21

Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY 388

Pisanello 389

Early Quattrocento Art and Architecture in Venice 393

Jacopo Bellini 395

Andrea Mantegna 397

Mantegna and Isabella d’Este 408

 

Oct. 23, 25

 

Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN

Gentile Bellini 411

Antonello da Messina 412

Giovanni Bellini 415

Vittore Carpaccio 421

Carlo Crivelli 425

Venetian Fabrics 426

Venetian Publishing 426

 

THE CINQUECENTO IN ROME: HIGH RENAISSANCE

(All Readings from Hartt & Wilkins)

 

Oct. 28, 30; Nov. 1

 

Chapter 16 THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH RENAISSANCE 442

Leonardo da Vinci 443

Michelangelo to 1505 469

Raphael in Perugia and Florence 480

 

Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME 486

Donato Bramante 489

 

Nov. 4, 6

Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME

Michelangelo 1505 to 1516 496

Raphael in Rome 515

 

Chapter 18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS c. 1520—50 542

Michelangelo 1516 to 1533 544

 

LATER VENETIAN AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENTS

(All Readings from Hartt & Wilkins)

 

Nov. 7, 11                               (ESSAY DUE:  IN CLASS FRIDAY NOV. 7)

 

Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND 590

Giorgione 592

Titian 596

 

Nov. 13, 15

 

Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND

Painting in Northern Italy 617

 

RENAISSANCE IN NORTHERN EUROPE

(All Readings from Harbison)

 

Nov. 18, 20

 

Introduction: The Self-Conscious Pragmatic Artist.

Ch. 1. Realism.

 

Nov. 22, 25, 27

 

2. Physical Production and Original Location.

3. Religious Behavior and Ideals.

4. Artistic Specialties and Social Developments.

 

 

Nov. 29; Dec. 2

 

Conclusion: Italy and the North.

 

Dec. 4

 

Review

 

FINAL EXAM: Date and location TBA

 

 

 

 

 


Other Course Information:

AVENUE TO LEARN:

In this course we will be using Avenue to Learn.  Students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course.  The available information is dependent on the technology used.  Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure.  If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure please discuss this with the course instructor.

SUPPORT SERVICES:

The University provides a variety of support services to help students manage their many demands. Reference librarians can provide invaluable research assistance. The Student Accessibility Services Centre (SAS) provides assistance with personal as well as academic matters. MUSC B107 and http://sas.mcmaster.ca/