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ARTHIST 4E03 Art/Visual Culture 1400-1750

Academic Year: Fall 2015

Term: 1

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Angela Sheng

Email: shenga@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 425

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23156

Website

Office Hours: Wednesdays, 13:00- 14:00 pm or by appointment



Course Objectives:

This seminar aims to familiarize students with critical readings on the current issues concerning art and visual culture from 1400 to 1750 CE, mostly in China, from an interdisciplinary approach grounded in Interculturality and shifting space into the era of Early Modern Globalization. This seminar will begin by exploring the concepts of Interculturality and Early Modern Globalization. Based on a few key exhibition catalogues, this seminar will explore the aesthetic and symbolic exchanges between China and other cultures in both the East and West. The seminar also aims to empower students to work together and undertake independent research projects, and then present them with confidence.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Brook, Timothy. 2008. Vermeer’s Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World. (New York: Bloomsbury Press). CB 401 .B76 2008

Clunas, Criag. 1997. Pictures and Visuality in Early Modern China (Princeton University Press.

Clunas, Craig. 2007. Empire of Great Brightness, Visual and Material Cultures of Ming China, 1368-1644 (University of Hawai’i Press). [Titles will not order from amazon.ca]

Sullivan, Michael. 1989. The Meeting of Eastern and Western art (University of California Press).

Additional required readings will be available on reserve at Mills Library or accessed online through JSTOR.


Method of Assessment:

Paper and Presentation 60%

  1. Topic, images, statement of interest, and preliminary bibliography, due September 22, 2015, 10% (details to be discussed in first class on September 8, 2015)
  2. Outline with added bibliography, presented and due October 6, 2015, 10%
  3. Presentation, December 8, 2015, 20%
  4. Final Paper, due December 11, 2015, 20%

 

Class Participation 40%

  1. Critical summaries of weekly readings, 30%
  2. In-class discussion, 10%

All written work is to be typed in font-size 12, double-spaced with a header that includes the student’s family name, number, and pagination.

 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Detailed reading list will be posted on Avenue.

September 8    Introduction: Interculturality and Early Modernity

                        Students sign up for topics to lead discussions.

September 15  Arts in China in 1400

September 22 Time, Space and Agency in Ming China

September 29 Cultures of Direction and Movement

October 6        Cultures of Text/ China and Europe

(October 13     TERM BREAK, NO CLASS)

October 20    The 17th Century and the Dawn of the Global World

October 27      Europe and China      

November 3    Image, Category and Knowledge

November 10  Pleasure, Play and Excess

November 17  Cultures of Violence

November 24  Ageing and Death

December 1     Afterlives

December 8     PRESENTATION, LAST CLASS

December 11   FINAL PAPER DUE, submit hard copy to SOTA Office, TSH414.

 


Other Course Information:

REFERENCE: Mills On Reserve

Barnhard, Richard (ed.) 1997. Three Thousand Years of Chinese Painting (Yale University Press). ND 1040 .T48 1997

Brook, Timothy. 1999. The Confusions of Pleasure, Commerce and Culture in Ming China (University of California Press). [purchase requested]

Clunas, Craig. 1996. Fruitful Sites: Garden Culture in Ming Dynasty China. (Duke University Press). Thode SB466.C5 C6 1996

Clunas, Craig, 1997, Art in China (Oxford University Press). N 7340 .C59 1997

Clunas, Craig. 2004. Superfluous Things: Material Culture and Social Status in Early Modern China (University of Hawai’i Press). HN 740 .Z9 S6233 2004

Clunas, Criag. 2007. Pictures and Visuality in Early Modern China (Princeton University Press). N 7343.5 .C6 1997B

Clunas, Craig. 2013. Screen of Kings: Royal Art and Power in Ming China (University of Hawai’i Press)N 7343.5 .C63 2013

Cahill, James. 1976. Hills Beyond a River: Chinese Painting of the Yuan Dynasty  (New York, Weatherhill). ND 1043.4 .C33 1976

Ebrey, Patricia Buckley. 1996. The Cambridge Illustrated History of China (Cambridge University Press). DS 706 .E37 1996

Fong, Wen. Beyond Representation: Chinese Painting and Calligraphy, 8th-14th Century. (New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art). ND 1043.3 .F66 1992

Harrist, Robert E. 1997. Power and Virtue: the horse in Chinese Art (New York, china Institute). N 7668 .H6H37 1997

Kerr, Rose et al. 1991. Chinese Art and Design (Victoria and Albert Museum). NK 1068 .K47 1991B

Ko, Dorothy. 1994. Teachers of the Inner Chambers: Women and Culture in Seventeenth­ Century China. (Stanford University Press). HQ 1767 .K6 1994 and ONLINE: Online

XX(1436209.1

Li, Chu‐tsing, and James C.Y. Watts (eds.) 1987. The Chinese Scholar’s Studio: Artistic Life in the Late Ming Period. [purchase requested]

Louis, Kam. 2002. Theorising Chinese Masculinity: Society and Gender in China (Cambridge University Press). [purchase requested]

Mungello, D.E. 1999.The Great Encounter of China and the West, 1500‐1800 (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc.). DS 750.72 .M86 1999

Rawski, Evelyn et al. (eds.). 2005. China: The Three Emperors, 1662-1795 (Royal Academy of Arts). N 7343.5 .C465 2005

Rawson, Jessica. 1984. Chinese Ornament: The Lotus and the Dragon (London, British Museum Press). NK 1483 .A1 R39 1984.

Silbergeld Jerome. 1982. Chinese Painting Style: Media, Methods and Principles of Form (University of Washington Press). ND 1040 .S47 1982

Spiro, Audrey G. 1990. Contemplating the Ancients: Aesthetic and Social Issues in Early Chinese Portraiture (University of California Press). N7591 .C5 S65 1990 EB

Stuart, Jan and Evelyn S. Rawski. 2001. Worshiping the Ancestors: Chinese Commemorative Portraits (Stanford University Press). ND 1326 .S78 2001

Vinograd, Richard. 1992. Boundaries of the Self: Chinese Portraits, 1600­1900 (Cambridge University Press). ND 1326 .V56 1992

For all citations in the written reports, please consult Chicago Manual of Style

Mills ONLINE Z253 .C53

Academic Integrity Policy

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process.  Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage.  This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads:  "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty:
For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/univsec/policy/AcademicIntegrity.pdf

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one's own or for which other credit has been obtained.
2.  Improper collaboration in group work.
3.  Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

PLEASE NOTE:

The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term.  The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances.  If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the
opportunity to comment on changes.  It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

When necessary, additional information and references will be posted on Avenue to Learn.