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MUSIC 4L03 Woodwind Methods (C01)

Academic Year: Winter 2019

Term: Winter

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Joseph Resendes

Email: resende@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 405A

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23676

Website

Office Hours: by appointment only



Course Objectives:

The goal of this course is to have students learn, through playing, the fundamentals of woodwind performance and pedagogy, and to develop approaches to teaching woodwinds in class situations. The course will be divided into two six-week sessions. Students will be assigned two different instruments for each session. By the end of the course students will:

  • understand the basics of how to play two woodwind instruments
  • understand optimal woodwind pedagogical practice, including breathing, posture, intonation, embouchure, tone production, correct fingerings, and technique
  • proper care/maintenance including assemble/disassemble procedures, and use of proper equipment or accessories.
  • Explore different classroom methods books, repertoire, and literature
  • Have the opportunity for peer-teaching

 

Laboratory Section Structure: 
This section meets together with Music 3K03: Brass Methods. The class will be assigned to woodwind, brass and percussion instruments to make up a workable band class or elementary performing ensemble. All students are expected to participate in the Lab Ensemble. Its purpose is to experience, through playing, a variety of band study and performance materials


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Method books and instruments will be provided, however we will also be using the “Habits of Musicianship”, a creative (and free!) online resource. Registration is required prior to downloading. This pedagogical approach is radically different than most method books.

MATERIALS:
Minimum of two (2) single reeds and one double reed per instrument assigned purchased from a local music store, or from our Cage Manager (pending availability).


Suggested Reading (Optional):

  • Kirkbride, Jerry, and William Dietz. Teaching woodwinds: a method and resource handbook for music educators. New York: Schirmer Books, 1998.
  • Ely, Mark C., and Van Deuren Amy E. Wind talk for woodwinds: a practical guide to understanding and teaching woodwind instruments. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.


Method of Assessment:

Evaluation will be based on 5 components:  2 in-class playing tests, 2 duets/trios or solo performances with piano at the conclusion of each 6-week session, a peer-teaching assignment and a final take-home exam.

  • Individual Playing Tests (2 x 12.5% = 25%)
  • Solos, Duets, Trios  (2 x 12.5% = 25%)
  • Peer Teaching Demonstrations (2 x 10% = 20%)
  • Compendium (2 x 10% = 20%)
  • Attendance & Participation (5% Lecture, 5% Lab = 10%)

NOTE: 
Students will receive 20% of their grade in this course by March 15th, 2019.

 

Individual Playing Tests: February 5, March 26
Students will be assigned an instrument (2 woodwind instruments for 6 weeks).  Students shall be expected to play 2 major scales, chromatic scale, 3 melodic tunes from the course method books, and orally answer 3 questions.  

 

Duets, Trios:  February 12, April 2
Students will be organized into small ensembles, and are to prepare two or three short pieces.  Each ensemble will perform in class at the scheduled dates.

 

Teaching Demonstrations:  February 14, April 4
4L03 Students will be paired and bring to class an individual (who is not a woodwind player or one who has no instrument/music background) to teach a 50 minute private lesson.  The lesson shall include the following:

  1. Proper assembly / disassembly including reed placement
  2. Proper embouchure and mouthpiece blowing, tonguing and breathing
  3. Proper posture, hand position, holding instrument (sitting and standing) and a minimum of 4-5 fingerings for the beginners
  4. Care and Maintenance (swabbing, mouthpiece care, etc.)

Students will complete a form provided by the instructor, and submit it at the following class meeting.  Late submissions will be penalized according to the policy stated below.  Grading will be based on active participation/teaching in the lesson and the completed form.

 

Two Compendiums: April 9
Students will develop a compendium for each of the instruments studied, i.e., flute, clarinet, saxophone, oboe, and bassoon.  Each compendium must be clear, succinct, and readable/understood at a school grade 6 level.  Each topic area of the compendium must be no more than one page (each page should cite source(s)).  The compendium topics will be provided on Avenue to Learn.  Late assignments will be penalized according to the policy stated below.


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Students are required to play the tests and submit assignments on the dates indicated. Late assignments will be deducted 10% per class-day late (assignments must be submitted during class-time to the instructor or they will be considered late). Alternate test dates for individual students will only be considered in exceptional circumstances. In such cases, appropriate documentation may be required, and if it is not provided, students risk forfeiting the mark for the course requirement.

 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Focus of class sessions will be posted on Avenue to Learn.

 


Other Course Information:

Participation Expectations

Given the fact that students will learn the basics of two instruments over the course of the term, it is expected that students should attend all classes and spend time outside of class time practicing these new skills.