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ART HIST 4C03 ART/VISUAL CULTURE 900-1400

Academic Year: Fall/Winter 2014/2015

Term: 1

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Angela Sheng

Email: shenga@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 425

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23156

Website

Office Hours: Mondays, 12:30- 13:30 pm or by appointment



Course Objectives:

This seminar aims to familiarize students with critical readings on the current issues concerning art and visual culture from 900 to 1400 CE in China and borderlands. Two fundamentally different worldviews underlie the sedentary agriculturalist and mobile nomadic cultures. When the latter such as the Khitans, Jurchens, Tanguts, and Mongols adapted the Han-chinese ways of life, they also brought their own conception of art and visual culture, giving rise to new, enriched intercultural manifestations. Informed by recent archaeological finds, the seminar aims to address the historiography and selected art works of both the Han-Chinese and mobile nomadic peoples. The seminar also aims to empower students to work together and undertake independent research projects, and then present them with confidence.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Kuhn, Dieter. 2009. The Age of Confucian Rule, the Song Transformation of China (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press).

Morgan, David. 2007. The Mongols (Wiley-Blackwell, 2nd edition).

Bloom, Jonathan and Sheila Blair. Islamic Arts (Phaidon, 1997).

 

Additional required readings will be available on reserve at Mills Library or accessed online through JSTOR.


Method of Assessment:

  1. Contribution to class discussion (including full attendance), 10%
  2. Written summary on Confucianism, Buddhism, and Islam due January 14, 2014, 10%, details in first class.
  3. Written reports on readings, due according to the reading schedule, 30% On January 7, 2015 students will sign up for topics for which they will lead discussions and extend into research papers--details in class.

4. Final presentation on April 8, and written report due April 10, 2015, 40% --the grade is further broken down by title, bibliography, and abstract—details in class.

5. Peer group evaluations, due April 10, 2015, 10% Students will work in small groups throughout the semester and self-evaluate on Group Performance Tasks, Group Maintenance Tasks, and Self-Centered Tasks, based on a detailed guideline from the McMaster Centre for Leadership Learning that will be given out in class.


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

This is a self-reporting tool for undergraduate students to report absences DUE TO MINOR MEDICAL SITUATIONS that last up to 5 days and provides the ability to request accommodation for any missed academic work. Please note, this tool cannot be used during any final examination period. You may submit a maximum of 1 Academic Work Missed request per term. It is YOUR responsibility to follow up with your Instructor immediately (NORMALLY WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS) regarding the nature of the accommodation. If you are absent for reasons other than medical reasons, for more than 5 days, or exceed 1 request per term, you MUST visit your Associate Dean's Office/Faculty Office). You may be required to provide supporting documentation. This form should be filled out immediately when you are about to return to class after your absence.

Missed work and late penalties: The course is designed so that all students must read and work on schedule. Handing in anything late does not help the progress of the ongoing discussion and group project. If a student misses the class for which the student has signed up to lead the discussion, the student will not get any marks for that opportunity.

 

If for a valid reason (if sick, with medical note) a student must be absent for the class when the student has signed up to lead the discussion, it is the student’s responsibility to 1) email the instructor the written report on the reading before class and to another student for the latter to read in class, or 2) switch the reading material and date with another student and inform the instructor in advance by email.

 

No extensions for the final written report without a timely medical certificate.

 

To get A+ requires correct spelling and grammar on all written work.

 

Grading Scale:

 

A+ 90-100      B+  77-79        C+  67-69        D+       57-59

A   85-89         B    73-76        C    63-66        D         53-56

A-  80-84        B-   70-72        C-   60-62        D-       50-52

                                                                         F           0-49

 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

The seminar will begin with an overview of Song China (960-1279), followed by a cursory study of the neighboring states of the Khitan Liao dynasty (907-1125) to China’s north, the Tangut Xi Xia dynasty (1038-1227) to China’s northwest, the Jurchen Jin dynasty (1127-1234) to China’s northeast, and followed by the Mongol Yuan dynasty in China (1206-1368). To fully appreciate the Mongol impact further west, we will also study the development of Islamic art and visual culture in Central Asia, culminating in Islamic chinoiserie. Detailed reading list given out in class. Class progress and availability of ordered texts pending, the topics and dates might be adjusted.

Week 1, January 7, 2015        Introduction, students sign up for groups and for readings.

Ebrey, Patricia. 1996. The Cambridge Illustrated History of China, Chapters 6, 7, and 8: Shifting South: The Song Dynasty, Alien Rule: The Liao, Jin and Yuan Dynasties, 136-185. Mills On Reserve DS 706 .E37 1996.

Hay, Jonathan. 1999. “Toward a Theory of the Intercultural,” Res 35 Spring 1999: anthropology and aesthetic, 5-9.

Week 2, January 14, 2015 Song China

Week 3, January 21, 2015 Northern Song paintings

Week 4, January 28, 2015 Southern Song paintings

Week 5, February 4, 2015 Khitan architecture and murals

Week 6, February 11, 2015 Tangut Xi-Xia Buddhist art

Reading Week, February 16-10

Week 7, February 25, 2015 Islamic art and architecture

Week 8, March 4, 2015 Islamic art and architecture

Week 9, March 11, 2014 Jurchen art and the visual culture of horses

Week 10, March 18, 2015 Mongol Yuan art and visual culture

Week 11, March 25, 2015 Islamic Chinoiserie

Week 12, April 1, 2015 Islamic Chinoiserie

Week 13, April 8, 2015 Presentations

 


Other Course Information:

 

Barnhard, Richard (ed.) 1997. Three Thousand Years of Chinese Painting (Yale University Press). ND 1040 .T48 1997

Cahill, James. 1976. Hills Beyond a River: Chinese Painting of the Yuan Dynasty  (New York, Weatherhill). ND 1043.4 .C33 1976

Fong, Wen. Beyond Representation: Chinese Painting and Calligraphy, 8th-14th Century. (New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art). ND 1043.3 .F66 1992

Harrist, Robert E. 1997. Power and Virtue: the horse in Chinese Art (New York, china Institute). N 7668 .H6H37 1997

Komaroff, Linda and Stefano Carboni.2002. The Legacy of Genghis Khan: courtly art and culture in western Asia, 1256-1353 (New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art)

N 7283 .L44 2002

Rawson, Jessica. 1984. Chinese Ornament: The Lotus and the Dragon (London, British Museum Press). NK 1483 .A1 R39 1984.

Steinhardt, Nancy. S. 1997. Liao Architecture (University of Hawaii Press).

NA 6046 .L5 S74 1997

 

On order

Bloom, Jonathan M. 2007. Arts of the City Victorious: Islamic Art and Architecture in Fatimid North Africa and Egypt (Yale University Press).

Blair, Sheila S. 20104. Text and Image in Medieval Persian Art. (Edinburgh University Press).

Kadoi, Yuka. 2009 Islamic Chinoiserie: The Art of Mongol Iran (Edinburgh University Press).

 

Starr, S. Frederick. 2013. Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane. (Princeton University Press).

Rossabi, Morris

 

The Journal of Song-Yuan Studies Mills ONLINE: Online XX(2167853.1)

 

For all citations in the written reports, please consult Chicago Manual of Style

Mills ONLINE Z253 .C53.

 

Please also consult http://library.mcmaster.ca/guides/art-history

 

All written work is to be typed in font-size 12, double-spaced with a header that includes the student’s family name, number, and pagination.

 

January 5, 2015          Classes begin

January 13, 2015        Last day for registration, adding or dropping courses

February 16-21, 2015 Mid-term recess

March 13, 2015          Last day for cancelling courses without failure by default

April 1-9, 2015           Test and Examination Ban

April 8, 2015              Classes end

April 10, 2015                        Final examinations start

 

Communication by Emails

It is the policy of the School of the Arts that all email communication
between students and instructors (including TAs) must originate from
their official McMaster University email accounts. This policy protects
the confidentiality and sensitivity of information and confirms the
identities of both the student and instructor. The School of the Arts'
instructors will delete messages that do not originate from McMaster
email accounts.

Academic Integrity Policy

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process.  Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage.  This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads:  "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty:
For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/univsec/policy/AcademicIntegrity.pdf

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one's own or for which other credit has been obtained.
2.  Improper collaboration in group work.
3.  Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

PLEASE NOTE:

The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term.  The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances.  If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the
opportunity to comment on changes.  It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

When necessary, additional information and references will be posted on Avenue to Learn.