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ARTHIST 2J03 Arch.Pre-Romanesque-Palladio

Academic Year: Winter 2017

Term: Winter

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Sabine Noack-Haley

Email: noacks@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 434

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23719

Office Hours: Office hours: Wednesday 10:00 am – 12:00 noon & by appointment, room TSH 434



Course Objectives:

Architecture in Europe from the Early Middle Ages to the Renaissance will be presented with various principal goals: 1. The students shall acquire the terminology required to describe architecture; 2. The students shall learn to analyze buildings formally, structurally, and iconographically; 3. The students shall gain an understanding of some architectural theory; 4. The students shall learn to analyze the interdependence between a building and its social context; and 5. The students shall become aware of the interaction between architecture and music (acoustics), sculpture, painting, and other artistic media. 


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Trachtenberg, Marvin and Isabelle Hyman, Architecture from Prehistory To Postmodernity. 2nd edition. Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall Inc., 2003

Additional reading and instructions for the homework assignments may be posted successively as the course progresses on the course website on ‘Avenue to Learn’.


Method of Assessment:

  1. Participation at lectures: 5%. Assessment criteria: Preparedness for class discussion as per reading requirements; regularity of attendance
  2. First homework assignment (reading drawings): 10%. A paper copy of the first homework assignment is to be submitted to the instructor in person no later than January 27, 2017 at 12:30 pm (at the beginning of class; will be graded prior to March 10, 2017).
  3. Second homework assignment (short essay): 20%. Assessment criteria: Overall structure of essay (15/100%); subject/object presentation and analysis (70/100%); language and terminology (15/100%). A paper copy of the second writing assignment is to be submitted to the instructor in person no later than March 28, 2017, at 12:30 pm (at the beginning of class).
  4. Pre-Romanesque in-class quiz: 10%
  5. Romanesque in-class quiz: 10%
  6. Gothic in-class quiz: 10%
  7. Renaissance in-class quiz: 10%
  8. Final exam: 25% 


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

The homework assignments and exams will receive a letter grade based on the grading scale shown below. Grading criteria for writing assignments will include factual accuracy, clarity of organization, appropriate use of examples, and style of presentation (including grammar, punctuation and spelling). Late submissions of the writing assignment will be penalized 3% per calendar day late, including weekends (e.g. a B+ paper, one day late becomes a B). Late penalties will not be waived unless your Faculty/Program Office advises the instructor that you have submitted to that office the appropriate documentation to support your inability to submit the work by the due date.

Final exam: No make-up exams will be given unless the absence was necessitated by a documented emergency; emergencies and/or absences must be processed through the student’s faculty office.

Grading Scale:

A+ 90-100      B+  77-79        C+  67-69        D+       57-59         F   0-49

A   85-89         B    73-76        C    63-66        D         53-56

A-  80-84        B-   70-72        C-   60-62        D-       50-52


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Week 1: Jan. 4 & 6: Introduction. A ‘rebirth’ of architecture in the 8th Century: Roman and Early Christian models, and the oldest surviving work of architectural theory, Vitruvius’ ‘De architectura’.

Reading: Textbook pp. 49-53. 122-125. 134-146. 162-168

Week 2: Jan. 10, 11, 13: Carolingian Pre-Romanesque, and Pre-Romanesque in Northern Spain.

Reading: Textbook pp. 171-178. 184-190; + pp. 113-119 in the following book (freely readable online):

https://books.google.ca/books?id=WdXQnaME1gMC&pg=PR7&dq=the+art+of+medieval+

spain&redir_esc=y&hl=en#v=onepage&q=the%20art%20of%20medieval%20spain&f=false

Week 3: Jan. 17: Pre-Romanesque in-class quiz. Early Romanesque in Germany.

Reading: Textbook pp. 190-196

Jan. 18, 20: Early Romanesque in Belgium, and Normandy. Early Vaulted Romanesque in Burgundy and the ‘Premier Art Roman’.

Week 4:   Jan. 24, 25, 27: High Romanesque in France, Spain, Italy, England and Germany.

Reading: Textbook pp. 196-211

              First homework assignment due (“Reading Drawings”) on Jan. 27 at 12:30 pm

Week 5:   Jan. 31: Romanesque in-class quiz. Gothic architecture in France.

Reading: Textbook pp. 221-245

Feb. 1, 3: Gothic architecture in France.

Week 6:   Feb. 7, 8, 10: Gothic architecture in England. In-class guest lecture on a Gothic chapel in England (day tbd)

Reading: Textbook pp. 245-253

Week 7:   Feb. 14, 15, 17: Late Gothic architecture in France, Spain, Germany, and Italy.

Reading: Textbook pp. 253-273

Week 8:   Reading week – no classes

Week 9:   Feb. 28: Gothic in-class quiz. The Italian Renaissance.

Reading: Textbook pp. 274-286

Mar. 1, 3: The Italian Renaissance: Brunelleschi, Michelozzo, Rossellino.

Week 10: Mar. 7, 8, 10: Leon Battista Alberti as architect and theorist. Giuliano da Sangallo. Bramante.

Reading: Textbook pp. 287-299

Week 11:  Mar. 14, 15, 17: The Renaissance villa. Raphael and Michelangelo as architects.

Reading: Textbook pp. 299-311

Week 12:  Mar. 21: Renaissance in-class quiz. The work of Andrea Palladio.

Mar. 22, 24: The work of Andrea Palladio: ‘I quattro libri dell’ architettura’ – theory and practice.

Reading: Textbook pp. 311-319

Week 13:  Mar. 28, 29, 31: Palladio, Vignola. The Renaissance in France and Spain.

Reading: Textbook pp. 319-325

                  Second homework assignment due (“Short Essay”) on Mar. 28 at 12:30 pm

Week 14:  Apr. 4: The Renaissance in England.

Apr. 5: Summary

Final exam


Other Course Information:

-- First homework assignment: Instructions will be provided on a handout. Second homework assignment: The essay is to be typed in font size 12, double spaced. A title page needs to provide the student’s first and last name and student number, course number, “Homework assignment 2”, submittal date, and essay title. The assignment shall have a title, and the text length for the assignment shall be 7-8 pages (not counting title page and bibliography). The essay text shall be followed by “Figures”, a “Bibliography”, and a list of “Sources of Illustrations”. Nature of the first homework assignment: The student will receive a hand-out from the instructor. There will be architectural drawings in the hand-out, which the student will have to work with following instructions on the hand-out itself. Nature of the second homework assignment: The instructor will post on ‘Avenue to learn’ a selection of five essay topics and further instructions.

-- Attendance at lectures is mandatory. Cellular phones and other communication devices should be turned off at the beginning of lectures. Students are expected to remain for the duration of the class meeting time. At certain points in the course it may make good sense to modify the schedule outlined above. The instructor reserves the right to modify elements of the course and will notify students accordingly (in class and posting any changes to the course website on ‘Avenue to Learn’).

-- Academic Integrity Policy: You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process.  Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity. Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage.  This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads:  "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty.
For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/univsec/policy/AcademicIntegrity.pdf

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one's own or for which other credit has been obtained.
2.  Improper collaboration in group work.
3.  Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

PLEASE NOTE:

The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term.  The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances.  If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes.  It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster e-mail and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

When necessary, additional information and references will be posted on Avenue to Learn.